oxalis

oxalis
oxalis

Wood sorrel (Oxalis) is a genus within the sorrel family, with around 800 species distributed in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. The name comes from the clover-like leaves, which taste sour and slightly salty. The botanical genus name is derived from the Greek words “oxýs” for sour and “hális” for salt. There are different species within the genus, such as Oxalis tetraphylla, known as lucky clover in pots, and horn sorrel (Oxalis corniculata), which spreads like a weed in gardens.

Oxalis is heterogeneous, with annual and perennial herbaceous plants that form tubers, bulbs, or rhizomes. The leaves are usually in three or four parts and have long-stemmed, hermaphrodite, and five-fold flowers that appear from April to September. Capsule fruits release seeds, and capsule fruits are formed that release seeds.

Wood sorrel (Oxalis acetosella) is widespread from Europe to East Asia, growing in mixed deciduous and coniferous forests. It forms low carpets with short runners and has clover-like, basal, threefold, lime green, heart-shaped leaves. Lucky clover, a perennial herbaceous onion plant, can be planted in partially shaded spots in rock gardens or housed in bright but cool window spots at 10 to 15 degrees Celsius.

Horn sorrel (Oxalis corniculata) is a weed introduced from southern Europe and the Middle East that spreads rapidly through runners and is often found in lawns and paving joints.

Common Names

Split-leaf philodendron, Swiss cheese plant, windowleaf, ceriman

Botanical Name

Monstera deliciosa

Family

Araceae

Plant Type

Vine

Mature Size

3 -15 ft. tall, 3-8 ft. wide

Sun Exposure

Partial

Soil Type

Well-drained

Soil pH

Acidic, neutral

Bloom Time

Summer

Flower Color

White

Hardiness Zones

10-12 (USDA)

Native Area

Central America

Toxicity

Toxic to humans,1 cats, and dogs2

Oxalis triangularis dormancy care and period

oxalis

Is it OK to eat oxalis?

Oxalis, or wood sorrel, has been consumed and used in various ways throughout history. Its roots can be enjoyed by detaching the bulb from the roots and planting new ones, while its leaves can be used for tea, dessert, and medicinal purposes. Oxalis is also a versatile plant for potted plants or ornamental gardens. It’s a good example of how weeds can be beneficial. If you prefer a pristine lawn, contact the lawn specialists at Cardinal Lawns for advice on how to maintain a lush, green lawn.

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Do oxalis bulbs multiply?
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What is Oxalis used for?

Oxalis corniculata, a medicinal plant, has been evaluated for its antibacterial, antifungal, and insecticidal properties. The study assessed the agrochemical potential of various fractions, including methanolic extract, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The crude, chloroform, and n-butanol fractions showed excellent activity against Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella typhi, and Bacillus subtilis, but no activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The fractions also showed significant activity against fungal strains like Fusarium solani, Aspergillus flexneri, and Aspergillus flavus. The study highlights the need for natural plant sources for safe insect control, as chemical pesticides have shown good results. The study also found that compound 2 was more active than compound 1 against tested bacterial strains and insects.

Is Oxalis a lucky plant?

A shamrock, originally a white clover (Trifolium repens), is a common lawn weed native to Ireland. It grows in clusters of three heart-shaped leaves on a thin, green stem, with a fourth leaflet emerging occasionally. The shamrock is believed to bring good luck to anyone who finds it. Over time, it became a symbol of rebellion, with wearing it risking death by hanging. According to legend, the shamrock was sacred to the Druids of Ireland, as its leaves formed a triad, a mystical number in Celtic religion. St. Patrick used the shamrock to illustrate the doctrine of the Holy Trinity in the 5th century. Today, the shamrock remains a symbol of Irish pride and culture, and good luck worldwide.

Is Oxalis a good plant?

Oxalis, the largest genus in the Oxalidaceae family, represents about 800 of the 900 species within the family. It is a large genus of flowering plants with over 550 species native to tropical climates of South America and South Asia. Oxalis are known as Wood Sorrels, False Shamrocks, and various other names. Oxalis triangularis is the most commonly cultivated houseplant. They are prolific and can go through a dormant phase in winter if not given enough light. However, with proper fertilizer and light, they can grow back. Many Oxalis, like most legumes, exhibit a phenomenon called nyctinasty, a rhythmic circadian nastic movement in response to darkness. The plant senses light quality and type via receptors and sends a response to the pulvini, which release sugars and potassium ions, causing the characteristic drooping of the leaflets.

How deep to plant oxalis bulbs

oxalis plant when touched

To touch an Oxalis plant, gently touch its leaves or stems with your fingers, avoiding excessive pressure or force. This allows you to observe the thigmotactic movement, where leaves close or fold in response to stimulation. Handle the plant with care and respect its natural behavior, ensuring it remains sensitive and delicate.

read more: Oxalis plant when touched Does Oxalis shoot seeds when touched?

oxalis

do oxalis bulbs multiply

Corms, also known as bulbs or rhizomes, are small, pine cone-like plants that can be planted vertically in a pot. Mixing the potting mix in a wheel barrow outside is easier and less messy. To plant Oxalis corms, use a chopstick or orchid stake to poke a hole in the potting mix and insert the corms. Keep the narrow end on top when placing the corms in, as turning them upside down will delay growth.

Add more potting mix to the top of the corms, covering about 1-1 1/2 inches. Gently insert each corm about an inch apart, keeping the narrow end on top. If the corms are placed upside down, they will still grow but take longer to see new growth.

After planting, give the plant a good watering and watch the growth begin to occur in a matter of days.

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