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English common names for plants like “pansy”, “viola” and “violet” can be used interchangeably. Pansies are classified in the Viola sect. Melanium, with four petals pointing upwards, while violets are classified in the Viola sect. Viola. The American Violet Society divides cultivated varieties into four subgroups: B1 – pansies, B2 – violas, B3 – violettas, and B4 – cornuta hybrids. Modern “pansies” differ from other three subgroups by having a well-defined “blotch” or “eye” in the middle of the flower.

Modern horticulturalists use the term “pansy” for multi-colored large-flowered hybrids grown for bedding purposes every year, while “viola” is usually reserved for smaller, more delicate annuals and perennials. In the early 19th century, Lady Mary Elizabeth Bennet collected and cultivated every sort of Viola tricolor (commonly, heartsease) she could procure in her father’s garden at Walton-upon-Thames, Surrey. Under the supervision of her gardener, William Richardson, a large variety of plants was produced via cross-breeding. In 1812, she introduced her pansies to the horticultural world, and in 1813, Mr. Lee further cultivated the flower.

James, Lord Gambier, and William Thompson were working on hybrids classed as Viola × wittrockiana, named after Swedish botanist Veit Brecher Wittrock. By 1833, there were 400 named pansies available to gardeners who once considered heartsease a weed. James Grieve developed the viola and Dr. Charles Stuart developed the violetta, both smaller, more compact plants than the pansy.

KingdomPlantae
Clade
Tracheophytes
CladeAngiosperms
CladeEudicots
CladeRosids
OrderMalpighiales
FamilyViolaceae
GenusViola
SpeciesV.  × wittrockiana

What is a pancy?

Pansy, a member of the Violaceae family, is a beautiful wildflower found throughout Europe, particularly in sun or semi-shade environments, dry meadows, fields, and roadside areas.

The plant has an average height of 15-30 centimetres and has hairless, round or heart-shaped lower leaves. The stems grow erect and are mostly branched. Pansy’s flowers are lateral growing, with each face having five petals. The plant’s unique feature is its three different colors, which are often yellow, white, or dark purple.

Dark lines radiate from the center of the blossom in an expressive pattern. The plant grows erect and mostly branched, with the stems growing erect and mostly branched.

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Where is pansy from?

The origin of pansies in Europe can be traced back to Iver, Buckinghamshire, England. In the early 1800s, Lord Gambier and his gardener William Thompson crossed various Viola species, including V. tricolor, V.Lutea, and possibly Russian-originating V. altacia. They selected plants for unusual colors, color combinations, and increasing flower size. William Thompson is credited with discovering a cross that began the new species V. x Wittrockiana, which featured a “face” of color on lower petals. Discovered in 1839, “Medora” became popular with gardeners and breeders throughout Europe.

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What is pansy used for?

The flowering pansy herb, which ripens seeds, is used to treat mild seborrheic skin diseases like dandruff, itching, cradle cap, and acne. It also helps treat internal skin disorders and is believed to purify blood or stimulate metabolism in traditional medicine.

 

What is common pansy called?

The Pansy, also known as Pansy Violet, is a low-growing plant renowned for its showy flowers. It is derived from the wildflower Heartsease, also known as Johnny Jump Up (Viola tricolor). The name “pansy” is also used in the common name of some wild flowers belonging to the violet genus Viola. The name “pansy” comes from the French word pensee, meaning “thought,” and is named because the flower resembles a human face. The Pansy has long been a symbol of Freethought, used in the American Secular Union’s literature and humanists’ appreciation for its appearance. The Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) also uses the pansy symbol in its lapel pins and literature.

Binomial:Viola x wittrockiana
Type:Cool season perennial
Propagation:By seed
Pest issues:Few
Disease issues:Uncommon
Bloom season:Cool season: autumn through spring
Pollination:Insect pollinated

care of pansy

Pansies are short-lived perennials that are popular for creating colorful pot and border displays. They have a wide range of flower colors, including blue, mauve, pink, purple, red, yellow, and white, and are often bicolored with a mixture of shades. Pansies flower all year round but are particularly useful in winter when little else is in bloom. Their botanical name is Viola x wittrockiana, which can cause confusion as there are many violas also widely used for pots and borders.

Pansies are easy to grow and are long-time garden favorites for creating colourful pots, window boxes, hanging baskets, and borders. They do best in fertile soil in sun or part shade, using a peat-free multi-purpose potting compost in pots and well-rotted organic matter in the ground before planting. Regular watering, feeding, and deadheading will keep pansies looking good and encourage more flowers.

Pansies are versatile and ideal for growing in all types of pot and container, either massed in a pot alone, mixed with other plants, or used to underplant large shrubs. They make perfect partners with spring bulbs such as tulips, as the bulbs grow up through and between the flowering pansies.

Planting pansies from late summer to mid/late autumn to bloom through winter and the following spring, or from spring to early summer to bloom through the growing season. Space spacing depends on planting time and variety size. Planting from late summer to early autumn is ideal, with bush varieties spaced 15 cm apart and trailing varieties 20-25 cm apart.

Use a good quality multi-purpose potting compost for pots and well-rotted garden compost or a planting compost first to improve soil. Water pansies during dry spells, feed them fortnightly with liquid fertilizer, and remove faded and dead flowers regularly to encourage new blooms. Pansies can be grown from seed, sowing seed under cover in February to April for late spring to autumn and May to July for autumn and winter flowering.

read more: How to grow Pansy from seeds?

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Type of pansy

Pansies, once considered weedy, have evolved into new cultivars with blotched and clear faces, ruffled petals, and extra-large flowers in a variety of candy hues. These short-lived perennials are grown as annuals or biennials in warm-weather climates. The modern pansy was developed as a hybrid from several Viola genus species, especially Viola tricolor. Pansies are cool-weather flowers that often succumb to the heat of summer and can be planted both in spring and fall when the weather cools. In warm-weather zones, they can be planted in fall to overwinter into the following year. Here are 5 unusual pansy varieties to consider for your spring garden. They can bounce back from late winter squalls of snow and ice with ease.

 

1- ‘Matrix Solar Flare’ (Viola × wittrockiana ‘Matrix Solar Flare’)

Matrix Solar Flare

2- ‘Cool Wave White’ (Viola × wittrockiana ‘Cool Wave White’)

'Cool Wave White' (Viola × wittrockiana 'Cool Wave White')

3- ‘Delta Premium Marina’ (Viola × wittrockiana ‘Delta Premium Marina’)

'Delta Premium Marina' (Viola × wittrockiana 'Delta Premium Marina')

4-‘Black Accord’ (Viola × wittrockiana ‘Black Accord’)

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5- ‘Inspire Plus Mardi Gras Mix’ (Viola × wittrockiana ‘Inspire Plus Mardi Gras Mix’)

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